Herb of the Day Lemon Balm

Bee Balm

(Melissa officionalis)

Greek physician Dioscorides would apply Lemon Balm to scorpion or animal bites for its antibacterial properties, and then give the patient wine infused with Lemon Balm to calm their nerves.

Medicinal Uses: Lemon balm is a member of the mint family. It is used to reduce stress and anxiety, promote sleep, improve appetite, and ease pain and discomfort associated with digestion. Combines well with valerian for a soothing, relaxing effect. For cold sores or herpes sores, steep 2 to 4 tsp of crushed leaf in 1 cup boiling water for 10 to 15 minutes. Cool. Apply tea with cotton balls to the sores throughout the day. An infusion of the leaves added to bath water is also said to promote the onset of menstruation.

 Lemon Balm should not be used by pregnant or breastfeeding women. Lemon balm may interfere with sedatives and thyroid medications.

 Magickal uses: Used in spells to ensure success.  It is used in spells associated with healing, health, friendship, love, and success.  Historically, it is a symbolic plant used to transmit messages between lovers.

Carry Lemon Balm in a charm or sachet to find love, or burn it as an incense when doing spells related to success.

Properties: Lemon Balm is carminative,  emmenagogue, stomachic, diaphoretic, antibacterial, anti viral  and febrifuge. Lemon balm contains terpenes, tannins and eugenol.

 Growth: Lemon balm is native to Europe but is now grown all over the world. In the spring and summer, clusters of small, light yellow flowers grow where the leaves meet the stem. The leaves are very deeply wrinkled and range from dark green to yellowish green in colour, depending on the soil and climate.

Source:
Author: Crick

Website: The Whispering Woods